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 Before the excitation, the fluorophore is in the ground state S0 , which has a characteristic dipole moment. Solvent molecules, which also have their characteristic dipole moment are oriented in such a way that the interactions dipole-dipole with the fluorophore are as favorable possible. When the fluorophore is prompted to the excited state, its electronic distribution switches almost instantly. At time zero after excitation the solvent molecules remain in their "​original"​ orientation to solvate ground state . The resulting dipole -dipole interactions with the fluorophore are hence less favorable. As a result , the solvent begins to relax to solvate the S1 state and brings the system to a more favorable position. Spectroscopically,​ this is manifested by the time-shift of the emission spectrum to longer wavelengths. Consider that the Steady-State spectrum is the time integral of all those shifting spectra. Measuring in the blue flank (λ1) will lead to a multiexponential decay: the signal decreases because of the shift and the intrinsic decay. Measuring in the red flank (λ3) will lead to a multiexponential decay with a negative pre-exponential factor: the signal first rises due to the increase in signal due to the displacement,​ and then decays due to the fluorescence lifetime. Before the excitation, the fluorophore is in the ground state S0 , which has a characteristic dipole moment. Solvent molecules, which also have their characteristic dipole moment are oriented in such a way that the interactions dipole-dipole with the fluorophore are as favorable possible. When the fluorophore is prompted to the excited state, its electronic distribution switches almost instantly. At time zero after excitation the solvent molecules remain in their "​original"​ orientation to solvate ground state . The resulting dipole -dipole interactions with the fluorophore are hence less favorable. As a result , the solvent begins to relax to solvate the S1 state and brings the system to a more favorable position. Spectroscopically,​ this is manifested by the time-shift of the emission spectrum to longer wavelengths. Consider that the Steady-State spectrum is the time integral of all those shifting spectra. Measuring in the blue flank (λ1) will lead to a multiexponential decay: the signal decreases because of the shift and the intrinsic decay. Measuring in the red flank (λ3) will lead to a multiexponential decay with a negative pre-exponential factor: the signal first rises due to the increase in signal due to the displacement,​ and then decays due to the fluorescence lifetime.
  
-In fluid media, solvation dynamics can be described with a multiexponential function spanning from the femtosecond time-scale to tens of picoseconds. Hence, the tail of this process can be monitored with a TCSPC spectrometer equipped with fast detectors such as a MCP or a Hybrid-PMT. In viscous media or at low temperatures,​ the ps tail component slows down to ns, and the process can be monitored with slower detectors, such as standard PMT.+In fluid media, solvation dynamics can be described with a multiexponential function spanning from the femtosecond time-scale to tens of picoseconds. Hence, the tail of this process can be monitored with a TCSPC spectrometer equipped with fast detectors such as a [[glossary:MCP]] or a Hybrid-PMT. In viscous media or at low temperatures,​ the ps tail component slows down to ns, and the process can be monitored with slower detectors, such as standard ​[[glossary:PMT]].
some_origins_of_multiexponetial_decays_for_single_dyes.txt · Last modified: 2015/11/03 15:09 by admin